GALLERY


The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, picture 1

"With my pictures I love to tell stories that take place in a dark and mysterious room, often with old-fashioned wallpaper in the background. The story of the shepherdess and the chimneysweep takes place in such a room. When no one else is looking, the porcelain figures and other objects live their own secret lives." (Els Cools).
Photo by: Ulrik Jantzen



The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, picture 2

"The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep is a strong, erotic fairytale. It is crammed with fragile porcelain, ladies in cupboards, chimneys and old Chinamen. A cupboard full of wives is a wonderful picture of the submission of women and the fact that they are purely ornamental. A picture of confinement and repression. So if I were a shepherdess, I would also take flight to the nearest chimney, and, moreover, the hero is the dark man! Barbara Cartland could not have told it better!" (Lisbeth Eugenie Christensen).
Photo by: Ulrik Jantzen



The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, picture 3

"My choice of motive is based on "What excites me about the text?" and "What is the most interesting thing to illustrate in relation to the manuscript?" The composition supports the theatrical atmosphere of the first row among the playing cards. I have chosen an abstract approach to that universe, partly to make it interesting as a picture, partly - and especially - to create tension on this scale." (Pia Halse).
Photo by: Ulrik Jantzen



The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, picture 4

"I wanted an old and worn expression, so I've worked on an old and slightly wrecked wooden slab. I've chosen to "collage-paint" the illustration, that is, with a lot of elements on top of each other. The result is that there are more elements in the illustration than those that belong to the part of the text that I was to illustrate." (Rasmus Juul).
Photo by: Ulrik Jantzen



The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, picture 5

"It was important for me to include the red colour. It stands for passion and love, and it is for love of each other that the two characters have escaped up into the chimney. That's why the shepherdess is wearing a red dress. She is the eye-catcher in the drawing, and it's also her perception of the world outside that I've focused on in the picture." (Charlotte Pardi).
Photo by: Ulrik Jantzen



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